House of Cards – by Radiohead

March 4, 2009
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Looked at this wonderful video by Radiohead yesterday in class – no cameras or lights were used to capture the footage – they used a new data capture device called LIDAR. We also discussed creative ways of visualizating data and the convergence of science/technology and art – and looked at PROCESSING – a new software program available for free download that enables artists to further visualize their work as well…
– FlashAddict

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http://radiohead.com/deadairspace/

Radiohead just released a new video for its song “House of Cards” from the album “In Rainbows”.

No cameras or lights were used. Instead two technologies were used to capture 3D images: Geometric Informatics and Velodyne LIDAR. Geometric Informatics scanning systems produce structured light to capture 3D images at close proximity, while a Velodyne Lidar system that uses multiple lasers is used to capture large environments such as landscapes. In this video, 64 lasers rotating and shooting in a 360 degree radius 900 times per minute produced all the exterior scenes.

Watch the making-of video to learn about how the video was made and the various technologies that were used to capture and render 3D data.

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HOUS_E OF/CARDS

In Radiohead’s new video for “House of Cards”, no cameras or lights were used. Instead, 3D plotting technologies collected information about the shapes and relative distances of objects. The video was created entirely with visualizations of that data.

Directed by James Frost
From the album IN RAINBOWS

Go to: http://code.google.com/radiohead to find additional pieces of data to create your own visualizations. Upload the results here:
http://www.youtube.com/group/houseofcards

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PROCESSING

Processing is an open source programming language and environment for people who want to program images, animation, and interactions. It is used by students, artists, designers, researchers, and hobbyists for learning, prototyping, and production. It is created to teach fundamentals of computer programming within a visual context and to serve as a software sketchbook and professional production tool. Processing is an alternative to proprietary software tools in the same domain.

Processing is free to download and available for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows. Please help to release the next version!

Processing is an open project initiated by Ben Fry and Casey Reas. It evolved from ideas explored in the Aesthetics and Computation Group at the MIT Media Lab. The project is currently improved and maintained by a small team of volunteers.

http://processing.org/

Examples of what Processing can do:

http://www.michael-hansmeyer.com/projects/project4.html

http://www.processing.org/learning/3d/cubicgrid.html


Commentary: Obama summons ghosts of American history

January 21, 2009

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Very eloquent piece that I came across on CNN.com – worth taking the time to read over…
– FlashAddict

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By Paul Begala
CNN Contributor

Editor’s note: Paul Begala, a Democratic strategist and CNN political contributor, was a political consultant for Bill Clinton’s presidential campaign in 1992 and was counselor to Clinton in the White House.

Paul Begala says Obama embodies the American dream, and our fate is now tied to his fate.

Paul Begala says Obama embodies the American dream, and our fate is now tied to his fate.

WASHINGTON (CNN) — Sometimes pictures tell a story better than words. On Inauguration Day, we saw Barack Obama, strong and certain, striding purposefully into the presidency.

And we saw Dick Cheney, once one of the most powerful people on Earth, reduced to being wheeled out of the White House.

Of course, we all wish good health for the former vice president, but the contrasting images were stark.

Barack Obama’s inaugural address was a bracing, brave break with the past.

“On this day,” he said, “we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn-out dogmas that for far too long have strangled our politics.” He sternly scolded the “greed and irresponsibility” of our current era, and called for “action, bold and swift.”

Take that, George W. Bush, whose false promises and worn-out dogmas have turned so much of the nation against him.

Barack Obama’s story is unique in its particulars, but it is universal in its appeal. One grandfather a Kenyan goat herder who opposed colonial rule, the other a Kansas farm boy who joined Patton’s army to fight the Nazis.

His parents’ marriage was illegal in 16 states, and his mother struggled, turning to food stamps to keep body and soul together, and waking young Barry up at 4:30 in the morning to nourish his brain.

He understands and appreciates the American Dream because he is its living embodiment. His story is our story. And now his fate and ours are inextricably intertwined.

As a speechwriter, I know you say a lot in the quotations you choose. President Barack Obama chose two and he chose wisely. First, St. Paul’s letter to the Corinthians in which he exhorts the people of Corinth to, in effect, grow up.

“When I was a child,” Paul wrote, “I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, and reasoned like a child. But when I became a man I put aside childish things.”

The new president used that ancient letter to deliver a badly needed message after eight years of anything goes: Put your big-boy pants on, America.

The president closed by quoting the words from Tom Paine that Gen. Washington ordered read aloud at Valley Forge. “Let it be told to the future world,” Washington said, “that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive… that the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet [it].”

The quote shows Obama’s belief in unflinching courage, unblinking realism and an unrelenting faith that by coming together we Americans can bend history to our will.

Of course, even as Washington words echoed, other ghosts of American history were milling about. Abe Lincoln prowled the Mall. FDR, his ever-present cigarette holder clenched in his smiling teeth, cheered zestily. Dr. King called out from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, and John F. Kennedy called back to him from the steps of the Capitol.

When Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963, President Kennedy watched it on TV from the White House. As King concluded, Kennedy said, “He’s good. He’s damn good.” I like to think that as Barack Obama concluded his inaugural address, Dr. King turned to President Kennedy and said, “This young man’s pretty damn good, too.”

http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/01/21/begala.obama/index.html


Yes, he must: coughing up Canadian-made BlackBerry a bitter pill for Obama

January 13, 2009

This is definitely a perplexing notion – how does one exist in the world today without being able to use email?!?!?
– FlashAddict

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By Lee-Anne Goodman, The Canadian Press

WASHINGTON – He’s been seen cradling it and gazing upon it almost as frequently as he’s cooed at babies and promised to bring change to Washington.

Barack Obama has a deep and abiding affection for his made-in-Canada BlackBerry, and yet the gods are conspiring against him – despite his best efforts, Obama will almost certainly be forced to dump his beloved Berry after his inauguration on Tuesday.

It’s a breakup the president-elect has long been dreading.

“I’m still clinging to my BlackBerry,” he said in a recent interview with CNBC. “They’re going to pry it out of my hands.”

Canada’s Research in Motion (TSX:RIM), the inventor and manufacturer of the BlackBerry, is adamant that its devices and security network protect all data passing through them. Officials for the company won’t comment on Obama’s fondness for their device – or his impending heartache.

But most technology experts say that no security systems – either at RIM or any other company – can ever be entirely safe from hackers, spies, snoops and trouble-makers, and point out that allowing Obama to keep his BlackBerry could pose a serious security risk.

White House security agencies and lawyers have not only insisted Obama abandon the BlackBerry, but email in general as well.

In addition to the security risk, they say, all presidential communications can be made public due to the Freedom of Information Act and the Presidential Records Act of 1978 – something that makes political strategists queasy.

Nonetheless, the notion of having to forego email and hand-held devices might seem inhumane and unimaginable to anyone under the age of 50, for whom emailing and texting has evolved into a primary mode of communication over the past 15 years.

The idea of an offline president seems equally bizarre.

“It just doesn’t seem right to me,” said Karen Daniel, a television producer from Knoxville, Tenn., who nurses her own hard-core Berry addiction. “He’s a man of his generation and this is how his generation communicates.”

Daniel’s not alone, according to the results of a survey conducted this week by the San Francisco Chronicle.

The newspaper asked its readers: “Should president-elect Barack Obama have to give up his BlackBerry?”

As of midday Tuesday, 50 per cent or respondents had said no, while only 18 per cent – clearly unfamiliar with how ubiquitous electronic communications have become – said he’ll be too busy with other matters to bother with checking email.

Nine per cent, however, said Obama should give up the BlackBerry to avoid creating a record of presidential doings, while 24 per cent argued the very opposite: he should keep it in order to create a record of presidential doings.

Daniel said she agrees that holding onto his BlackBerry will only help to keep Obama honest.

“It makes him more transparent,” said Daniel, who recently went through withdrawal symptoms of her own when her Berry went on the blink for days, leaving her in a communications no-man’s land while vacationing in New York.

“If he doesn’t mind that people will be able to read his exchanges in years to come, then why can’t he hold onto it?”

Former Obama campaign manager David Plouffe, who delivered a luncheon speech Tuesday in Toronto as part of an international speaking tour, agreed that losing the BlackBerry would be more than just an inconvenience for his one-time boss.

“It’s an important way for him to operate with his colleagues, but also it’s very important for him to stay in touch with … his friends and his family,” Plouffe said.

“It’s something he’s really struggling with.”

Obama’s not the first president to have to give up the conveniences of modern communication.

While Bill Clinton sent only two email messages as president and has reportedly never warmed to the habit, George W. Bush expressed sadness when he was forced to stop emailing in January 2001.

He even said recently he’s looking forward to emailing “my buddies” when he returns to Texas from Washington.

But for Obama, losing his Berry is a particularly bitter irony considering his historic campaign for the presidency was largely launched on technological battle fronts – on Facebook, MySpace, YouTube, Twitter and via emails and text messages.

He emailed friends and family and even actress Scarlett Johansson with the device. He kept his eye on it while attending his daughters’ soccer games in Chicago. He was ridiculed for carrying it in a holster on his belt – something of a fashion faux pas among technology snobs.

“It’s not just the flow of information,” a mournful Obama said last week.

“What it has to do with is having mechanisms where you are interacting with people who are outside of the White House in a meaningful way. And I’ve got to look for every opportunity to do that – ways that aren’t scripted, ways that aren’t controlled … ways of staying grounded.”

There might be a solution on the horizon for Obama, however.

Some hand-held devices have been approved as secure enough to handle even classified documents, email and Web browsing, raising the possibility that perhaps Obama might be allowed some sort of Berry-ish gadget.

The General Dynamics’ Sectera Edge is a combination phone-PDA that retails for a pricey US$3,350. It’s been certified by the National Security Agency as being acceptable for top secret voice communications, e-mail and Web sites, and it’s sturdy – able to withstand numerous four-foot drops onto concrete.

There was no immediate word from Obama’s transition team about whether the phone might be an option for the president-elect.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/090113/world/inauguration_obama_blackberry


Video Art – Emily Carr

January 13, 2009

Sombrio – Paul Manly

Sombrio is a 60 minute documentary about a community of squatters and surfers who lived on a beach on the southwest coast of Vancouver Island BC. The documentary follows the residents over a two year period leading up to their eviction and follows up four years later.
http://manlymedia.com/documentaries/sombrio

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Cremaster (The Order) – Matthew Barney


– considers his videos not art but sculptures