Voice-Over Narration as an Active Agent in Film

December 9, 2009

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I wrote this essay for my MHIS 429 Topics in Film/Video course this semester at the Emily Carr University of Art + Design. Special thanks to Sarah Wichlacz for her essay titled, “Issues of Narration: Voice-Over in Film” which definitely helped me in the writing of my own essay. You can see her very well written piece at http://sarahwichlacz.com/?p=74

– FlashAddict

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Voice-Over Narration as an Active Agent in Film

The use of voice-over narration can and has been used in film to help convey greater depth and meaning to the audience. Whereas on the one hand, there are some who see it as a crutch when the director or writer is unable to move along the storyline effectively within a given scene; yet on the other however, when it is used effectively, voice-over narration can be inserted as an active agent to help provide greater impact and understanding to the audience in a way that a complex actor’s performance or scenery cannot convey. It is within this context that this essay will explore individual examples of voice-over narration from select films in which both sides of the issue will be explored; by not simply analyzing each voice-over narration example as either good or bad, but looking deeper at how the context and overall delivery affect the films, scenes and actors within.

To begin with, a proper definition of voice-over narration in film must be established, “Narration, or voice-over, is used in both documentary and fiction. It may be used to deliver information, provide the point of view of an unseen character, or allow an onscreen character to comment on the action.”(Ascher and Pincus 493) Put more simply, “A narrative text is a text in which an agent relates (‘tells’) a story in a particular medium, such as language, imagery, sound, buildings, or a combination thereof.” (Bal 5) By using this standard, multiple methods of providing voice-over narration in film can be utilized to help tell their respective stories, “In documentary filmmaking some of the key stylistic questions relate to how much the filmmaker attempts to control or interact with the subjects, and to the way information is conveyed in the movie.” (Ascher and Pincus 332)

The style adopted by U.K. documentarians such as John Grierson in the 1930s and 1940s is a kind of hybrid that can involve staged events and real people (non-actors)…Many of these films use a ‘voice of God’ narration-the authoritative male voice that provides factual information and often spells out the message intended for the viewer to take from the film. (Ascher and Pincus 333)

On the other side of the spectrum, Ascher & Pincus further explain:

Cinema vérité (also called just vérité or direct cinema) films attempt to spontaneously react to events and capture life as it is lived…Many of these films use no narration or interviews and attempt to minimize the sense that the material has been influenced or interpreted by the filmmaker. (Ascher and Pincus 333)

Within this context, one of the most notable examples of the use of voice-over narration can be seen in the opening of the film, Citizen Kane (1941), “The film’s plot sets another purveyor of knowledge, the ‘News on the March’ short. We’ve already seen the crucial functions of the newsreel in introducing us both to Kane’s story and to its plot construction, with the newsreel’s sections previewing the parts of the film as a whole.” (Bordwell and Thompson 105) In essence, this scene of paramount importance was purposely written by Orson Welles in order to allow the principal characters follow-up with further details later on in the film in their own flashback narrations.

The reinforcement of the scenes, characters and events detailed in this brief montage showcasing Kane’s life over the span of only a few minutes is accentuated, as referenced earlier by Ascher and Pincus, via the deep authoritative voice in which the booming male narrator speaks, which was quite representative on the actual newsreel footage of the era. In other words, by creating a fictionalized representation of a factually based newsreel within a film and having a similar sounding voice actor provide the narration within it, Welles provided the audience with further reinforcement of the importance of Charles Foster Kane on a global scale, in which he truly was within his own Xanadu.

Further evidence of life imitating art and vice versa comes from the voice-over narration within the film, Little Children (2006) which featured the deep resonating male voice of Will Lyman as the film’s narrator. Lyman’s voice was already recognizable, even his face wasn’t, for the 125 episodes of the PBS documentary television show Frontline (1982-2009) that he has narrated. With such various titles as, A Death in Tehran (2009), Breaking the Bank (2009), and Black Money (2009), Lyman has narrated multiple episodes for the series, while remaining unseen to the audience, in which investigative journalists scour the globe looking for corruption, abuse of power and instances of government, humanitarian and ecological tragedies.

To that end, Little Children (2006) director Todd Field must have realized the impact that Lyman’s voice would have on the film’s audience as an implied and trusted broker of knowledge and wisdom. “In the history of the documentary, this voice has been for the most part that of the male, and its power resides in the possession of knowledge and in the privileged, unquestioned activity of interpretation.” (Doane 369)

One scene of particular note from the film is where the character of the husband, Richard Pierce, shows the length to which he will go in order to satiate his obsession. The scene opens up with him in his work office as his secretary heads home for the night and now suddenly alone, Richard decides to indulge his favorite pastime of late, masturbating to pictures of the internet sensation that is Slutty Kay. In comes the booming, authoritative and faceless voice of narrator Will Lyman, as the audience begins to realize the level of Richard’s obsession at not being able to truly connect with her.

Lately, Slutty Kay had become a problem. He thought about her far too often and spent hours studying the thousands of photographs available to him…Though as close as Richard sometimes felt to Slutty Kay, as much as he believed that he knew her, he could never get past the uncomfortable fact she existed for him solely as a digital image. The panties were an attempt to solve this problem, maybe a sniff or two would hurry things along so he could get back downstairs to his real life, where his wife was waiting for him; her impatience increasing by the minute…(Little Children)

To that end, the scene changes to his home office as he now tries to put on her soiled panties over his head in order to accentuate the experience, as the frame changes yet again to show Richard’s wife coming upstairs as Lyman explains her growing impatience and finds him masturbating while breathing deeply into the soiled panties. Lyman’s matter of fact and monotonous voice-over breathes, for lack of a better term, immense irony into the scene and provides a very functional backdrop in order to place such an absurd setting as a woman walking into her husband’s office and finding him masturbating to a Polaroid of a naked woman while gasping into a pair of soiled woman’s panties. “The different components of the cinematic narrator as diagramed usually work in consort, but sometimes the implied author creates an ironic tension between two of them.” (Chatman 484)

An additional aspect of voice-over narration is when the director or creative vision behind the film as a whole provides the narration themselves. Take for instance the case from the film, A River Runs Through It (1992), in which director Robert Redford took on the persona of the book’s original author, Norman MacLean, and provided the film’s flashback voice-overs.

…films often create the sense of character-narration so strongly that one accepts the voice-over narrator as if he of she were the mouthpiece of the image-maker either for the whole film or for the duration of his or her embedded story. We put our faith in the voice not created but as creator. (Kozloff 45)

After auditioning several different prominent voice-over actors, Redford was not happy with any of the takes and as a result, he decided to try it out himself. Given Redford’s long standing stature within the film industry and recognizable voice, what followed was that he was able to further personify the essence of what the author and main character experienced while growing up in small-town Montana, the trials he went through with his younger brother Paul and how the quiet and serene beauty of glacier fed streams full of trout could help heal the soul. This was especially evident in the final scene of the film in which the viewer sees what is now an elderly and frail looking Norman MacLean fishing the river alone, with Redford’s voice-over providing the full meaning as Paul reflects on his life.

Now nearly all those I loved and did not understand when I was young are dead, but I still reach out to them.  Of course, now I am too old to be much of a fisherman, and now of course I usually fish the big waters alone, although some friends think I shouldn’t. Then in the Arctic half-light of the canyon, all existence fades to a being with my soul and memories and the sounds of the Big Blackfoot River and a four-count rhythm and the hope that a fish will rise.

Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it. The river was cut by the world’s great flood and runs over rocks from the basement of time. On some of the rocks are timeless raindrops. Under the rocks are the words, and some of the words are theirs.

I am haunted by waters. (A River Runs Through It)

The next logical focus to explore is whether or not to use voice-over narration at all and how the format is different from written media for example, “Unlike in literature, in film the distinction between telling a story through verbal narration and showing it on the screen through images and action is not so easily discountable.” (Kozloff 13) A case in point for this argument comes from the multiple versions of the film, Blade Runner (1982), in which it has gone from its original theatrical release to being re-edited seven times to its most recent ‘Final Cut’. The most obvious change that was made from the original film was the removal of Deckard’s voice-over and while this had already been removed from an earlier 1992 ‘Director’s Cut,’ this final version of the film was also the only version that director Ridley Scott had complete artistic control over.

The climactic scene of the film in which the removal of the voice-over warranted greatest scrutiny was the scene near the end of the film, where on the original inception of Deckard’s monotonous voice-over was further evidence, although somewhat ambiguous, of him being a replicant (a humanoid looking robot who cannot show or feel emotion), from a viewer’s perspective, the use of the voice-over caused more controversy than it was worth according to prolific filmmaker, Frank Darabont:

There’s one area where I thought the voice-over was so clunky; it landed with such a hollow thud, was the ‘Tears in Rain.’ I remember when I first saw the movie, I’m in the theatre and I am so drawn in by what Rutger Hauer is doing and I am so drawn in by what the theme of the movie has brought us to, this magnificent moment where he is letting go of life…‘I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe, all these moments will be lost, in time, like Tears in Rain. Time to die.’

And right as I am just…it’s like having sex and someone dumps cold water on you. Right at that moment where I am at my most emotional crescendo as a viewer, here comes this thudding, dunderheaded voice-over, ‘I don’t know why he saved my life, maybe in those last moments, he loved life more than he ever had before.’ Yes, I know that, thank you. Thank you for kicking this beautiful, delicate, emotional note that we were achieving right in the nuts. (Dangerous Days: Making Blade Runner)

Conversely, in the subsequent versions of the film in which Deckard’s monologue has been removed, greater emphasis has been placed on Rutger Hauer’s performance of Roy when he releases the dove as he dies and it flies up to the dark and stormy clouds above. Layered over all of this is the minimalist orchestration by the film’s composer, Vangelis and the slightest of crescendo booming sound as Deckard slowly closes his eyes and deeply inhales as he bears witness to his former foe’s final testimony; all of which is realized without the use of the voice-over.

At the end of the shooting cycle and on the bottom of the cutting room floor, directors, editors and screenplay writers have debated the merits of inserting or removing voice-over narration in film for decades now. In some instances, overall theme, plot and character development or simply personal taste can dictate whether or not to use voice-overs to help provide the audience with a greater understanding of what they are seeing on the screen. To that end however, and when it is an active agent in the storytelling process and manufactured to cater to the targeted audience in subtle and imperceptible ways, then voice-over narration can help bridge the gap between what can and cannot be shown on film. But if it is used in a contrived and convoluted manner, then the opposite can occur and further alienate the audience from being able to fully appreciate the level of understanding that the filmmakers are trying to achieve.

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Works Cited

A River Runs Through It. Dir. Robert Redford. Allied Filmmakers, 1992

Ascher, Steven, and Pincus, Edward. The Filmmaker’s Handbook. New York: PLUME, 2007

Bal, Mieke. Narratology: Introduction to the Theory of Narrative. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1985.

Bordwell, David, and Thompson, Kirstin. FILM ART: An Introduction. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2008.

Braudy, Leo and Marshall Cohen, eds. Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Chatman, Seymour. “The Cinematic Narrator.” Braudy and Cohen, 473-86.

Dangerous Days: Making Blade Runner. Dir. Charles de Lauzirika, Frank Darabont, 2007. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_nsSxblpoI

Doane, Mary Ann. The Voice in the Cinema: The Articulation of Body and Space. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1980

Kozloff, Barbara. Invisible Storytellers: Voice-Over Narration in American Fiction Film. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988.

Little Children. Dir. Todd Field. New Line Cinema, Bona Fide Productions, Standard Film Company, 2006.

Wichlacz, Sarah. 27 May 2006. Issues of Narration: Voice-Over Film. http://sarahwichlacz.com/?p=74


Blocked by Facebook – Personal Journeys – Help John with his Art Project

January 17, 2009

Hello everyone,

Well, I guess the automated powers that be at Facebook have blocked me from sending out anymore Friend Requests to fellow Emily Carr University students/faculty/associates linked in to the school groups that can be found when you do a search. I can understand why they have such automated features, but it’s frustrating to be lopped into the same category as spammers, phishers or other types of crooks.

Because of this, I am asking for your help. If you feel that this project has merit and is worth the effort to bring in others to tell their stories as well, I would like to ask you to invite your friends to join the event. The future of this project is now in your hands as I cannot do it without you. Please help me in seeing this project become a reality because it means so much to me and I know that it means a great deal to you as well.

Sincerely,

John DeVeaux

– Here is the link to the Facebook event page -Personal Journeys – Help John with his Art Project

http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=46093168338

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As a gift to everyone, please go to:

https://flashaddict.wordpress.com/2009/01/15/shot-by-shot-analysis-of-the-music-video-glosoli-by-sigur-ros/

The lyrics are sung in Icelandic, yet one need not know what the words mean in order to interpret the value and depth that they and the imagery convey. I actually don’t want to know what the lyrics translate to in English because it would take away the beauty and serenity that I found interpreting it myself.

Enjoy!

Instructions:
1. Watch the full video without pause to understand the essence of the piece.

2. Read through my shot-by-shot written breakdown.

3. Watch the video again and take in a new personal understanding of the imagery.

4. Rewind and go back to individual shots and if you feel inspired, write down what they mean to you and compare them to mine.

5. Smile and feel a sense of peace = All will be OK.

John

Please be kind to my film terminology – there were so many terms that we learned last semester, that it was a bit of information overload and I may have mixed some up 🙂

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PS After spending 15 minutes trying to find out how to actually send an email to Facebook customer service, I sent them the following letter asking for their help as well:

To whom it may concern,

I was just recently blocked from sending friend requests on Facebook. As a result of that, I felt it would be prudent that I send you an email to let you know that I am not some dirty old man trying to prey on young children, nor am I a nefarious crook trying to swindle little old ladies out of their life savings.

I understand that you guys have to have set TOS standards and I know why I was tacked onto the list of possible spammers/crooks by sending friend requests. I have been in your shoes as I have worked many customer service gigs, most importantly when I worked for eBay in their investigations department and had to respond to complaints sent in my members about other members, with spam being one of the biggest issues reported.

That being said however, I am just an aspiring art student struck by inspiration and in the process of trying to invite people to join my Art Project as I feel that it is a great event to participate in. I am not trying to sell anything, I am just asking people to share their stories with me and am sending Friend Requests to my fellow art students and art enthusiasts (people who would want to participate in such an event). I’m not asking for much here, but please check out my event page and see for yourself “Personal Journeys – Help John with his Art Project.” I’m not a bad guy, I’m just trying to create a beautiful piece of art and to allow people to tell others their story.

Please let me know where I can go from here – I need your help.

Sincerely,

John DeVeaux


Shot-by-Shot analysis of the music video – Glósóli by Sigur Ros

January 15, 2009

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Our Video Art instructor, Christine Stewart played this video as her contribution to the Personal Inspiration Project that all of the students showed in class today. As chance would have it, I had just recently published this video on both my blog and facebook pages and had just watched it the night before as it is one of my all-time favorites. Seeing as though my main art piece is focusing on Personal Journeys, I wanted to take things a bit further, so I decided to do my own personal shot-by-shot analysis of the video after class. This process allowed me to gain a much deeper understanding of the piece and its internal Journey.  I hope that you will enjoy it – I know I did!
– FlashAddict

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Sigur Ros – Glosoli

– 0:01 – solitary chord lingers as the screen fades in revealing a young boy sitting on the edge of a body of water with a drum by his side – searching the horizon from side to side – Little Drummer Boy = leader and protector
– 0:10 – cue music – first cut – reveals a dirty over the shoulder closeup of the Little Drummer Boy and his hair blowing in the wind
– 0:13 – second cut – closeup of the Little Drummer Boy‘s drumstick resting in his fingers on his lap – he releases the first tap in his fingers to the beat of the bass
– 0:21 – after a few other closeups of the drumstick – the main beat of the song comes up and the Little Drummer Boy starts tapping his foot to the beat
– 0:25 – the Little Drummer Boy feels a call to action, stands and picks up his drum – the journey is about to begin…
– 0:35 – incredible shot when the Little Drummer Boy walks into the frame to walk up the hill and the camera pans from right to left to follow him up – wonderful imagery – again to the change in the song’s beat
– 0:45 – we see the Little Drummer Boy traversing a quite difficult patch of volcanic rock fields and hills that goes far off in the distance to the horizon = the journey is long but worthwhile
– 0:47 – again to the change in the beat, the Little Drummer Boy pauses when he realizes that he is not alone – he needs friends to join and help him on his journey = compatriots
– 0:54 – to the beat of the drumming, the Little Drummer Boy bangs his drum once as a rallying call to whoever is living in the rock house on the hill
– 0:56 – beautiful scene of the young girl raising her head from under the rock wall while wearing the cute bear head costume and then we see the Little Drummer Boy – she is wary to join him but he gives her a simple yet lovingly warm smile in return = All will be OK – then his head swivels to the left to lead her and her sister (who pops up afterwards) to follow on the journey
– 1:15 – tender scene between the two sisters and the older one holds the hand of her younger sister and helps her traverse the difficult volcanic landscape
– 1:19 – scene opens up to reveal another young boy waiting on a rock in the middle of the volcanic rockfield as if he has been waiting for them all along
– 1:22 – the boy is apprehensive and a bit scared to follow however he doesn’t want to get left behind as the others continue on with their journey
– 1:27 – hey guys wait for me – he seems to emote as he finds his courage and runs after the group to join them
– 1:35 – another tender moment as the group encounters a small stream blocking their path – Little Drummer Boy lends his hand to the girls and the new boy to help them across
– 1:42 – the camera pans through the swaying long grass to reveal the serene face of a young and cute icelandic girl with the face of an angel – which then opens up to more shots of the faces the other children sitting in the grass and sharing tender moments together (as if they are inside the womb) – culminating in the Little Drummer Boy smiling a reassuring smile again = All is Good
– 2:13 – the group of children decide to keep marching and leave the protective womb of the high grass fields
– 2:19 – shot reveals girls playing skip rope and young boys hanging out and simply being boyz getting into trouble and mischief – yet they also feel the tapping of the drumbea with their feet and feel the desire to join the journey as well
– 2:28 – the cadence of the musical beat changes to that of a clapping staccato rhythm – scene opens up to reveal two boys trying to light an abandoned car on fire with a gerrycan of gasoline and an open flame (never a good idea) – makes me giggle a bit when the boy with the gerrycan spills some of the gasoline and could have nearly lit himself on fire!
– 2:34 – and still the beat goes on – as we see the feet of the children walking and drumming along to the beat
– 2:37 – they cross a threshold of manmade technology (the road/highway) cutting through the pristine and untouched wilderness and yet the Little Drummer Boy leads them further into the wild = take the road less travelled
– 2:44 – shot of the three young girls building the rock monument/house out with a gigantic volcanic rock field = simple gestures can create powerful bonds
– 2:55 – the Visual Representation of Youth makes his appearance – the youngest child of the group – represented by a young boy sleeping in the rock field = beautiful, innocent, peaceful, serenity, youth
– 3:02 – the Little Drummer Boy realizes that the Visual Representation of Youth is sleeping so asks everyone to be quiet – and so they all scout out a place of their own to join the Visual Representation of Youth
– 3:16 – closeup shot of the Visual Representation of Youth – stirring slightly as the other children lay down – shhhhhhh – we have to be very gentle and quiet…
– 3:33 – young and cute icelandic girl with the face of an angel turns over because she can’t sleep – so she reaches out to grab the hand of the Little Drummer Boy so she can sleep soundly
– 3:41 – zoomed out group shot of all of the children sleeping in peaceful slumber – cue fade through black
– 3:49 – sunrise – rebirth – the march continues as the music beat picks up in intensity – the Little Drummer Boy enters from left frame leading the group across the landscape bathed in a golden yellow hue from the morning sunshine
– 3:55 – the camera pans down to show the children marching in single file, with their feet stepping to the beat of the music in unison
– 4:07 – the Little Drummer Boy brings the group to a halt and now has a concentrated and stoic look on his face as the shot is a shoulder closeup of his face with the children standing behind him in support
– 4:10 – shot changes to reveal the other children finding their courage as well as they stand with the Little Drummer Boy as one unit looking on the task that they all face together
– 4:12 – resolve – there is no turning back – as the Little Drummer Boy looks down to gather his courage
– 4:15 – in unison with the rising beat of the music – the Little Drummer Boy begins beating his own drum for the very first time
– 4:17 – continued closeups of the other children as they all find their courage and resolve from the Little Drummer Boy‘s  drumming
– 4:22 – 1/2 shot showing the Little Drummer Boy and the other children in a collective resolve and getting ready to unleash their energy as a whole
– 4:35 – the camera switches sides and is now behind the Little Drummer Boy – so we as the audience have now become the other children and we need to find our resolve and courage now
– 4:39 – the calm before the storm – even though the beat of the music is very heavy at this point – the Little Drummer Boy holds us back like potential energy or a waterfall holding back a massive reservoir of water
– 4:41 – CHARGEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee………. (best part of the song here by the way)
– 4:42 – the children run past the camera – meaning that they are running past us as the audience from the viewpoint
– 4:46 – humorous moment as the Little Drummer Boy drops his drum because he no longer needs the crutch anymore – he is well on his way to becomming a man – but he nearly takes out the girl on his right in the process as she nearly bails as she trips on the drum
– 4:48 – focus of the girl with the bear hat costume as she takes the cue from the Little Drummer Boy and discards her crutch as well – she is becomming a woman
– 4:50 – the Little Drummer Boy and the rest of the children are running at full speed to reach the top of the hill – they are giving it all their might
– 4:54 – we see the Little Drummer Boy‘s drum rolling backwards down the hill to find a new child to attach itself to as the Visual Representation of Youth enters the frame and watches the drum roll down – he is slower than the rest, but no less determined
– 4:57 – as the lead guitar its most powerful riff of the song – we have a head shot closeup of the bear hat girl and another girl running with the wind in their hair
– 5:01 – long shot showing the children running full bore up the incline of the hill – there is nothing that can stop them now
– 5:03 – two seagulls flying blissfully in the air enter from frame left and forshadow the children’s future
– 5:07 – the lead singer breaks out into his wail/scream as the children approach the edge of the cliff – further foreshadowing of the seagulls effortlessly rising up and down with the currents of air = point of no return
– 5:14 – camera moves in closer but still a long shot as the children get even more tantilizingly close to the cliff’s edge – we see the final image of the seagull far off in the background becomming them to follow – it exits from the frame just as = the Little Drummer Boy and the bear hat girl arrive to the edge first = first to mature
– 5:19 – closeup of the Little Drummer Boy‘s right foot as he takes his leap of faith and jumps off the cliff – the scene is full of tension, both implied and literal – what will happen to him when he steps off?
– 5:20 – one last breath before the plunge as the Little Drummer Boy takes a mighty leap into the unknown
– 5:21 – bear hat girl and the rest of the children are not far behind and follow him into adulthood
– 5:23 – the Little Drummer Boy finds his own path and begins plotting his own destiny
– 5:24 – camera shifts perspective again and we as the audience become the children as we watch the others run past us and jump off to find their respective destinies
– 5:27 – long shot view showing most of the children able to make it on their own as they reach for the stars
– 5:29 – check out the view from up here the Little Drummer Boy seems to emote as he is savouring his new found freedom
– 5:33 – but what about the Visual Representation of Youth – is he too small to make the jump – will he be able to survive on his own – as he approaches the final steps of his childhood
– 5:36 – the Visual Representation of Youth pauses on the edge of the cliff and briefly debates whether to make the jump or not – he is still a little scared of the unknown
– 5:38 – we follow the rest of the children as they are well on their way and savouring their ability to spread their wings
– 5:39 – the Little Drummer Boy looks even further into the future with eyes of assurance and as before = All is Good
– 5:41 – like a big brother, the Little Drummer Boy takes one last look back at the other children, but he knows that they will be able to find their path and succeed on their own – he doesn’t need to worry about them anymore
– 5:42 – having reached a decision, the Visual Representation of Youth decides to go for it and like a giant coiled spring, he leaps off the cliff with all of his might but seems to fall as he briefly stumbles before finding his own path to follow
– 5:48 – closeup of the Visual Representation of Youth’s sparkling teeth and a giant smile = pure joy as the he finally finds his strength – as the music equally reaches its crescendo and begins to fade out
– 5:51 – closeup of the rest of the children smiling and feeling euphoric = Bliss
– 6:04 – end music – the endless waves of the water below with the camera panning up to show the horizon in the distance = their future is their own now – only they can decide where to go from here


Little Children – Trailer

September 13, 2008

Best movie of 2006 in my humble opinion – very original and two of the actors in it, Patrick Wilson and Jackie Earle Haley will be appearing in the upcoming movie, “WATCHMEN” – watch the trailer below to check it out.